Android Operating Systems

Android 1.5 CupcakeAndroid 1.5 Cup Cake
Full Name: Google Android 1.5
Short Name: Android 1.5
Developer: Google
Codename: Cupcake
Release Date: April 01, 2009
Predecessor: Google Android 1.0

Characteristics
Operating System Family: Android operating systems
Operating System Kernel: Linux 2.6.27
Supported CPU Instruction Set(s): x86, ARM

Additional Details
Related Page: http://source.android.com/roadmap/cupcake

Pros
Surprisingly useful on-screen keyboard. Fast, accurate voice search. Plenty of feature enhancements and minor bug fixes.
Cons
Disappointing video recorder. Multimedia support is still lacking.
Bottom Line
Google’s continues to add new functionality to its open-source smartphone OS, despite of the wireless industry’s reluctance to rally around the platform.

      


Android 1.6 Donut
Android 1.6 Donut
Nearly six months later, and the first major overhaul of the Android system was unveiled by Google – and it was so good that a number of devices are still running the platform today. With this launch came an improved Android Market experience to make it easier to find applications, an enhanced camera and gallery and vastly improved voice search to let you flick through the phone and dial friends using only the power of your vocal cords. Higher screen resolutions were also included as part of the upgrade, giving rise to sumptuous WVGA (800×480) screens that make up a vast range of high end smartphones today. More crucially, it brought speed improvements to the OS that meant users no longer wanted to throw their phone at a wall while waiting to write a text and later on even added free turn-by-turn navigation to rival dedicated sat-navs. (Source The 2011 Android App Guide)

Full Name: Google Android 1.6
Short Name: Android 1.6
Developer: Google
Codename: Donut
Release Date: September 16, 2009
Predecessor: Google Android 1.5 (Cupcake)

Characteristics
Operating System Family: Android operating systems
Operating System Kernel: Linux 2.6.29
Supported CPU Instruction Set(s): x86, ARM

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-1.6-highlights.html

      


Android 2.1 Eclair
Android 2.1 Eclair
While Donut really brought Android up to speed with the rest of the smartphone market, it was still lacking in a number of areas that users were beginning to bay for. With Android 2.0 and 2.1 (Eclair was released relatively soon after Donut and contained a number of bug fixes) that was rectified, bringing in elements like better contrast ratios for backgrounds and HTML5 support. The cool new element was the integrated contact support – simply tap in your Facebook user and password and sync your friends up with your phone’s address book for easy access. Work-bods were sorted too, as Exchange support finally arrived without the need for a third party application, and Live Wallpapers brought a touch of fund and movement to the back of your phone screen. Other new toys, such as a digital camera zoom, LED flash support and Bluetooth 2.1 meant an enhanced multimedia and snapping experience, while tighter integration with the phone hardware meant faster speeds, too. (Source The 2011 Android App Guide)

Full Name: Google Android 2.1
Short Name: Android 2.1
Developer: Google
Codename: Eclair
Release Date: January 11, 2010
Predecessor: Google Android 2.0.1 (Eclair)

Characteristics
Operating System Family: Android operating systems
Operating System Kernel: Linux 2.6.29
Supported CPU Instruction Set(s): x86, ARM

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-2.1.html

      


Android 2.2 Froyo
Android 2.2 Froyo
The first platform to be used on a tablet, we got our first taste of Frozen Yogurt back in May 2010, which offered up a huge boost in general usage speed using something called a JIT (just in time) compiler. Adobe Flash turned up with it, too, meaning a number of devices were now able to view the web as it was meant to be seen – something Apple still can’t manage to this day. USB tethering and the ability to turn your phone into a Wi-Fi hotspot meant users could finally free the data from their contract, and support for installing applications to memory cards meant applications could finally become more resource-intensive. Little tweaks like being able to remotely wipe the phone and improved application launchers might not seem like much, but they contribute hugely to the gloss Android was finally starting to gain. (Source The 2011 Android App Guide)

Full Name: Google Android 2.2
Short Name: Android 2.2
Developer: Google
Codename: Froyo
Release Date: May 20, 2010
Predecessor: Google Android 2.1 (Eclair)

Characteristics
Operating System Family: Android operating systems
Operating System Kernel: Linux 2.6.32.9
Supported CPU Instruction Set(s): x86, ARM

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-2.2-highlights.html

      


Android 2.3/2.4 Gingerbread
Android 2.3/2.4 Gingerbread
Gingerbread is a popular smartphone release to this day. Although also used on many tablets, that brings support for extra high-res devices (WXGA and higher) but also a new user design and new colors to the icons. Oh, and the battery meter is now horizontal, rather than vertical – pivotal stuff. Support for Near Field Communications, like the tech seen in your Oyster card, and a massively improved keyboard both showed the next-gen capabilities of this platform and new integration for front-facing cameras as video calling became more prevalent. With the release of devices such as the Sony Ericsson Xperia Play – with dedicated hardware buttons – audio, graphical and input enhancements for game developers were also included as a welcome means of helping to beef up Android’s gaming prowess. (Source The 2011 Android App Guide)

Full Name: Google Android 2.3.7
Short Name: Android 2.3.7
Developer: Google
Codename: Gingerbread
Release Date: September 15, 2011
Predecessor: Google Android 2.3.6 (Gingerbread)

Characteristics
Operating System Family: Android operating systems
Operating System Kernel: Linux 2.6.36
Supported CPU Instruction Set(s): x86, ARM

Additional Details
Related Page: http://d.android.com/sdk/android-2.3-highlights.html

      


Android 3.0 Honeycomb
Android 3.0/3.1/3.2 Honeycomb
The advent of Android tablets has meant that a dedicated operating system is needed. With the introduction of Honeycomb, Android got just that, with a three dimensional desktop and revamped widgets designed to fit on a larger, high-resolution screens. Multi-pane viewing meant users could see emails both from their inbox and in full view at once and an integrated video chat client made seeing and speaking to your buddies at the same time much easier. Where previous iterations of Android had depended on physical keys, the new Android 3.0 OS did away with this, and offered new thumbnail multi-tasking to make flicking through programs much easier. The main change was support for dual core devices, though, as this meant a new realm of power could be exploited without the huge drain of battery life. (Source The 2011 Android App Guide)

Full Name: Google Android 3.0/3.1/3.2
Short Name: Android 3.0/3.1/3.2
Developer: Google
Codename: Honeycomb
Release Date: March, 2011

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-3.0-highlights.html

Pros
Most configurable tablet OS. Widest range of hardware choices. Excellent notification system. Free GPS navigation. Adobe Flash support.
Cons
Few third-party apps. Tablet apps in difficult to find in the Android Market. Out of the box, user interface is very sparse. In browser, sites tend to show WAP versions rather than desktop Web pages.
Bottom Line
Google’s Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) OS will appear on many tablets this year, but it needs a more vibrant developer community and better app store to compete with Apple in the tablet space.

      


Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich
Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich
The first thing you’ll notice about Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) is the shiny veneer that the UI has been given. As the first major update to the smartphone version of Android in almost a year it comes as something of a shock to those used to Gingerbread. Less so if you’ve used a Honeycomb tablet – most of the visual flair in ICS comes from, or is at least inspired by, Android 3.0 (Honeycomb). The homescreen gets the most dramatic make-over, with a new launcher and resizeable widgets, all wrapped up in that ice blue on black color scheme. The new unlock screen has a novel facial recognition feature, but it’s more of a toy than a security feature. (AndroidCommunity.com)

Full Name: Google Android 4.0
Short Name: Android 4.0
Developer: Google
Codename: Ice Cream Sandwich
Release Date: November, 2011

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-4.0-highlights.html


    


Android 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 Jelly Bean
Android 4.1 Jelly Bean
Welcome to Android 4.1 the first version of Jelly Bean! Android 4.1 is the fastest and smoothest version of Android yet. We’ve made improvements throughout the platform and added great new features for users and developers. This document provides a glimpse of what’s new for developers. Android 4.1 is optimized to deliver Android’s best performance and lowest touch latency, in an effortless, intuitive UI.

To ensure a consistent framerate, Android 4.1 extends vsync timing across all drawing and animation done by the Android framework. Everything runs in lockstep against a 16 millisecond vsync heartbeat — application rendering, touch events, screen composition, and display refresh — so frames don’t get ahead or behind.

Android 4.1 also adds triple buffering in the graphics pipeline, for more consistent rendering that makes everything feel smoother, from scrolling to paging and animations.

Full Name: Google Android 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
Short Name: Android 4.1, Android 4.2, Android 4.3
Developer: Google
Codename: Jelly Bean
Release Date: 2012

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/about/versions/jelly-bean.html


jelly1-100  jelly2-100  jelly3-100


Android 4.4 Kit Kat
Android 4.4 KitKat
Welcome to Android 4.4 KitKat! Android KitKat brings all of Android’s most innovative, most beautiful, and most useful features to more devices everywhere. Android 4.4 is designed to run fast, smooth, and responsively on a much broader range of devices than ever before — including on millions of entry-level devices around the world that have as little as 512MB RAM.

KitKat streamlines every major component to reduce memory use and introduces new APIs and tools to help you create innovative, responsive, memory-efficient applications.

Full Name: Google Android 4.4
Short Name: Android 4.4
Developer: Google
Codename: KitKat
Release Date: 2013

Additional Details
Related Page: http://developer.android.com/about/versions/kitkat.html


Android 4.4 KitKat  Android 4.4 KitKat  Android 4.4 KitKat